Light Review: Fenix TK30 White Laser LEP

LEP, what is LEP? Laser Excited Phosphor, the new super thrower with a highly focused beam; and I was certainly excited to try out the Fenix (see MyFenix in the UK) TK30 White LEP light. I first came across the concept of LEP to be used as a long range tactical scope illuminator for snipers, and there is no doubt this is a highly specialised type of light. For long range scope illumination it is outstanding, and for the general lighting enthusiast it is a lightsaber, with near laser beam like projection.

First up is a video which covers the basics of a look round the TK30 and some outdoor video to show the incredible beam. This page has a lot more detail including the measured output figures, runtime graph and photos of the beam.

What is in the box?:


A good look round the TK30 – Things to look out for here are:
The TK30 comes with an excellent belt holster, and a 21700 cell that has a built-in USB-C charging port (in the cell, not the TK30).


The beam

Please be careful not to judge tint based on images you see on a computer screen. Unless properly calibrated, the screen itself will change the perceived tint.

The indoor beamshot is intended to give an idea of the beam shape/quality rather than tint. All beamshots are taken using daylight white balance. The woodwork (stairs and skirting) are painted Farrow & Ball “Off-White”, and the walls are a light sandy colour called ‘String’ again by Farrow & Ball. I don’t actually have a ‘white wall’ in the house to use for this, and my wife won’t have one!

Yes, this really is the beam, not a mistake. There is a small bright spot with all 500lm (422lm measured) in it.


Batteries and output:

The runs on the included 5000mAh 21700 cell.

Please note, all quoted lumen figures are from a DIY integrating sphere, and according to ANSI standards. Although every effort is made to give as accurate a result as possible, they should be taken as an estimate only. The results can be used to compare outputs in this review and others I have published.

Peak Beam intensity measured 469000lx @1m giving a beam range of 1370m!!!

In this gallery are measurements of the built-in USB-C charging for the 5000mAh cell, and the runtime graph (with active cooling).


Troubleshooting

This section is included to mention any minor niggles I come across during testing, in case the information helps anyone else.

It was noted that when the low battery warning is shown with the flashing indicator in the side switch, this makes the main beam output flicker. More on this is included in the ‘in use’ section below.

As per the description of this section, this information is provided in case anyone else finds a similar ‘issue’ that might be fixed in the same way.

The TK30 in use
Let’s first just get the minor quibble out of the way with the output that starts to flicker when the low battery warning comes on. It is shown in the marked copy of the runtime graph and only affects the very last part of the run. I personally take this as a point of the output being so near the end and not able to maintain the full output, that I would want to recharge the battery anyway at this point.

In some ways, the visible beam flickering is only further indication the battery is too low, so is not a problem so much as a ‘feature’. Moving on…

So the operation of the TK30 is just fine, a tail-switch, and a side switch for the mode. Easy and straightforward to use.

Although the high beam output is only in the region of 500lm, I would say that the heat generated and felt at the head of the TK30 is more than I would expect for a 500lm light. But this is no ordinary 500lm light. Inside the head is a UV Laser module that is then illuminating a phosphor surface to produce the beam, so overall it is not as efficient as a typical LED emitter and so generates more heat.

Swapping from the included 21700 cell to an 18650 (with adapter), the runtime is much less, and the lower efficiency of LEP to LED becomes even more obvious. A trade off in efficiency in exchange for a beam unlike any other.

Just take a look through this gallery. (I have used the Moon to cheat with a couple of these, it’s not quite that amazing.)


Review Summary
The views expressed in this summary table are from the point of view of the reviewer’s personal use. I am not a member of the armed forces and cannot comment on its use beyond that covered in the review.

Something that might be a ‘pro’ for one user can be a ‘con’ for another, so the comments are categorised based on my requirements. You should consider all points and if they could be beneficial to you.

_______________________________________________
What doesn’t work so well for me
_______________________________________________

Not really a ‘con’, but a warning – this is a specialist light and is not suitable for general use due to the tiny hotspot and no spill.
Shorter runtime compared to an LED light.

_______________________________________________
Things I like
_______________________________________________

Super focused beam with 1370m throw!
LEP – Laser Excited Phosphor.
USB-C rechargeable 21700 cell and cable included.
Very good belt holster.
It’s just superb fun to have a lightsaber / white laser.

 
Discussing the Review:
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Gear Review: Wiley X Captivate Lenses (Models shown – Contend, Peak and Breach)

In this review, it’s all about a lens; a new Wiley X lens. As someone who relies daily on the best quality sunglasses, but that also needs EN. 166 & ANSI Z87.1 safety standards, Wiley X has been my go-to brand and has never let me down. I also, in most cases, prefer polarized lenses for glare reduction and enhancing colour depth. Wiley X have now produced a further enhancement to the polarized lens by increasing colour contrast with the CAPTIVATE lens. In this review the focus is primarily on this new lens itself, but can be seen in three of the first models to feature the lens; Contend, Peak and Breach (which also has the gasket technology).

What’s in the box?:


Here is what is included for all three models.


A look round the Contend:
This ‘Contend’ has the Blue mirror version of the CAPTIVATE lens.


A look round the Peak:
For the ‘Peak’ it is the Copper CAPTIVATE lens.


A look round the Breach:
Lastly the ‘Breach’ has the Bronze Mirror CAPTIVATE lens. Also look out for the gasket, and in this model, the side vents that can be opened and closed as required.


What is the CAPTIVATE lens like to use?

First impressions? That is actually very difficult to describe when you go from one of Wiley X’s already superb polarized lenses to the new enhanced CAPTIVATE polarized lens. Between one Wiley X polarized lens and the CAPTIVATE lens, is there a marked difference? It is simply not possible for there to be a massive difference. Instead it has taken a longer period of use to really appreciate the improvement, as I have now experienced a wide range or lighting conditions and locations with differing colour ranges.

None of the lens versions on test are completely neutral, so all give a slight colour cast to the overall rendition of what you see. This is one aspect of the eyewear we choose that adds an extra dimension and allows us to see more and differently than without any lens.

Since getting to know the new CAPTIVATE lens, I’ve been trying to work out how to best show what this lens does, and am still no satisfied, but here goes with my attempt.

Bear in mind, that like all of our senses, we have our own built in ‘automatic balance’, so like a camera has a White Balance setting, and this can be set to Auto White Balance, our eyes also do this to some degree, and after wearing a lens for a period of time our eyes adjust to them.

Coming from daily use of Wiley X lenses already, first impressions were of an excellent lens, but could I see what made them different? Over time, and with swapping back to the standard polarized lens, the answer was yes. What I was seeing through the CAPTIVATE lens was clearer and more defined. It was subtle, but the impression was of sharper edges, and a higher clarity. As we are seeing objects which don’t typically have a ‘border’ or ‘outline’ in a different colour, we are seeing the edge of an object as its colour meets the next background or object colour.

The intent of the CAPTIVATE lens is for it to reduce light in the parts of the light spectrum where Blue merges with Green, and where Green merges with Red so that you see a more significant difference between blue/green and green/red boundaries.

This is not done to such an extent that you can’t see certain shades, but so that you have an impression of higher contrast between colours. As I said before, this is not so marked you put them on and see something so unreal, but rather that with more use you can appreciate how clearly you are seeing your surroundings.

In an attempt to show the effect of these lenses, I am including two galleries with photographs taken through the different lenses. In the first set, the camera is set to a fixed Daylight White Balance (so is not adjusting the colour balance), and in the second set the camera is set to Auto White Balance to try to introduce some of the acclimatisation our eyes have.

There is a control shot first with no lens in front of the camera, then the three different models.

Daylight White Balance set


Auto White Balance set
This is the set I feel, more closely represents what your eyes see (but not exactly) for each lens type. The stand-out photo is probably the one of the metal cover in a pavement which has weeds growing round it and when you go from the control shot to the Contend lens. The green really stands out.
Another characteristic I like about the Bronze Mirror lens in the Breach was how it gave a pleasing deep bronze cast to the rusted metal surfaces in road furniture (manhole covers etc).


Review Summary

The views expressed in this summary table are from the point of view of the reviewer’s personal use. I am not a member of the armed forces and cannot comment on its use beyond that covered in the review.

Something that might be a ‘pro’ for one user can be a ‘con’ for another, so the comments are categorised based on my requirements. You should consider all points and if they could be beneficial to you.

I’m trying something slightly different and starting with what doesn’t work so well, so I can finish on a more positive note

_______________________________________________
What doesn’t work so well for me
_______________________________________________

Sorry, not being biased, but really nothing.

_______________________________________________
Things I like
_______________________________________________

Lens quality.
The clarity of vision.
Subtle effect of the enhanced colour contrast.
Strong and comfortable frames.
More innovation from Wiley X.

Light Review: Weltool 365nm UV/Red lights – M2-OL, M2-BF and M7-RD

For my first Weltool review I’m taking a look at some specialist lighting options; no white light here, instead it’s two lights with 365nm UV output, and one pure Red 625nm output. The models on test are the M2-OL (flood beam 365nm UV light kit with charger and cell), M2-BF (pure 365nm UV output, light only), and the M7-RD (625nm Red output with USB chargeable cell).

What is in the box?:
A quick overview of the three models and how they arrived. The M2-OL also includes a single-bay USB charger in the box.


A good look round all three of the models – Things to look out for here are:
The first one to be unpacked was the M2-OL. All three use a very similar chassis, with minor differences. For the two that included 18650 cells, each had an insulator disk to prevent accidental switch-on during transit. The lens/bezel arrangement is different in each of the three.


Taking a more detailed look at the charger and cells:
The M2-OL included a flat top 18650 with USB charger, and the M7-RD came with a USB rechargeable 18650 (no cell was included with the M2-BF). After looking over the set of contacts and the image of the flat top cell, you can also see a side shot of the cell in the charger where the negative contact end is raised slightly. This was required for the positive contact to touch the positive terminal in the charger.


The beam

Please be careful not to judge tint based on images you see on a computer screen. Unless properly calibrated, the screen itself will change the perceived tint.

The indoor beamshot is intended to give an idea of the beam shape/quality rather than tint. All beamshots are taken using daylight white balance. The woodwork (stairs and skirting) are painted Farrow & Ball “Off-White”, and the walls are a light sandy colour called ‘String’ again by Farrow & Ball. I don’t actually have a ‘white wall’ in the house to use for this, and my wife won’t have one!

In this set of beamshots, the only outdoor beamshot is of the M7-RD red beam, as the UV lights do not show up anything significant for this type of image. However, where it gets interesting is indoors. For this gallery, the first image is for the M2-OL, which is not pure UV, having some blue light. The next image is at the exact same exposure with the M2-BF that has a filtered output so it is pure 365nm UV light, and the only visible features are those fluorescing in the UV. The last two are of the red beam of the M7-RD.


Special beam galleries:
To properly appreciate the output of these dedicated UV lights the next two galleries are needed. In the first gallery are two sets of images, each set of the same scene, starting with a control image using a warm white light, then the M2-OL, and finally the M2-BF. The results are very clear.


In this second special gallery are two views from a pebble beach, where the confusion of the stones easily hides details that UV can reveal. In this gallery, a control warm white light is used, and the M2-BF. The last image shows bank note security features and the glow around the spots on a banana skin.


Batteries and output:

Please note, all quoted lumen figures are from a DIY integrating sphere, and according to ANSI standards. Although every effort is made to give as accurate a result as possible, they should be taken as an estimate only. The results can be used to compare outputs in this review and others I have published.

Included here are two charging traces, first for the USB charger and 18650 cell that came with the M2-OL, and second for the USB chargeable 18650 that came with the M7-RD. Lastly is a runtime graph for the M7-RD (which should be showing the actual lumen output), and the M2-BF showing a simulated output. The integrating sphere sensor does NOT measure UV, so in this run for the M2-BF I included fluorescent material inside the sphere to convert some of the UV to visible light. Doing this allows for a ‘relative’ output trace over the full runtime, but is not a measurement of actual lumens.


Troubleshooting

This section is included to mention any minor niggles I come across during testing, in case the information helps anyone else.

As mentioned in the previous section “Taking a more detailed look at the charger and cells:” The flat-top cell supplied with the M2-OL would not charge in the supplied USB charger. This was because the plastic wrap on the cell left the positive terminal slightly recessed. To allow charging the negative end of the cell just needed to be raised slightly.

Not a big issue and easily rectified. I mention it here in case you find the same and need to use this simple fix.

As per the description of this section, this information is provided in case anyone else finds a similar ‘issue’ that might be fixed in the same way.

The M2-OL, M2-BF and M7-RD in use:

These are specialist lights, so really shine (pun intended) in specific situations. If you are an enthusiast in portable lighting, then you might not really ‘need’ these lights, but they will be great fun to add to your line up.
If you are in need of them for their special purposes, then you have some really strong performers to choose from. Before getting to the model-specific comments, a quick look at their sizes; I am slightly surprised there is so much variation when based on the same body and switch, but each of these three is a different length, and has been fine tuned to the LED and lens configuration. All three lights have two output levels selectable with a quick on-off-on via the forward-clicky tailcap switch; all three start on low if left off for 2s or more.

M7-RD RED: Weltool describe the M7-RD as a choice that won’t affect dark adapted eyes. For this I partly disagree; yes, red light does have less of an effect on your night vision, but the M7-RD is very bright, and will still affect your night vision. Use this at a star party (if that is your bag) and you will be shouted at. However, I find it particularly useful for hunting. The quarry I often target does not appear to react to pure red light, and this means I can use a good brightness red light to help me, instead of a super dim light where I’d struggle to see (especially when using a gun light that is much brighter).

M2-OL UV: After looking at the special beamshot galleries, the M2-OL, might seem a lesser choice for a UV light, but the mix of UV with some blue light has a place. It means that you have some ‘supporting’ light to see other features in the scene even if they don’t react to UV. This mix of light is helpful and gives a different view of the area.

M2-BF: This is the most specialist of the three, as there is a filter lens to remove all but the pure 365nm UV light. If there is nothing to fluoresce, you won’t see anything. In the photo below, the M2-BF is on, but apart from the glow of the paper surface in front of the lens, you might not know it was on at all.
With this super pure UV you can reveal hidden details, and often show things you might rather you hadn’t seen! The M2-BF is the ultimate in true ‘black light’ as long as you don’t need any visible light mixed in.


Review Summary
The views expressed in this summary table are from the point of view of the reviewer’s personal use. I am not a member of the armed forces and cannot comment on its use beyond that covered in the review.

Something that might be a ‘pro’ for one user can be a ‘con’ for another, so the comments are categorised based on my requirements. You should consider all points and if they could be beneficial to you.

_______________________________________________
What doesn’t work so well for me
_______________________________________________

Minor issue with the USB charger and flat-top cell.
M7-RD’s Red output is too bright for saving night vision.
They are 18650 powered only, so no option for primary cells.

_______________________________________________
Things I like
_______________________________________________

Great fit and finish for all models.
Choice of different beam profiles to suit your needs.
M7-RD has a USB chargeable cell that does not need a separate charger.
M2-OL includes a full kit including a cell and charger.
M2-BF outputs pure filtered 365nm ‘black light’.

Knife Review: Fallkniven A1x

Not that I have ever doubted the strength of Fallkniven’s knives, but as soon as I saw there would be full exposed tang versions of their popular models I had to get hold of one! So the ‘x’ series delivers the A1, S1 and F1 with full tang and removable scales as the A1x, S1x, and F1x. The ‘x’ series also boast new updated sheaths with locking system. In this review of the Fallkniven A1x, join me in taking a good look at how this new version of an already tried and tested knife stacks up. It’s a beast!

A few more details:

What’s in the box?:

A sad sign of the times is that a ‘genuine product’ sticker can be found on the box (sad that the unscrupulous are selling fake Fallkniven knives).
The Alx is simply presented wrapped in bubble wrap in its sheath.


A good look round the A1x’s sheath – Things to look out for here are:

Fallkniven have put a lot of thought into the x series sheath, building on previous versions and the ‘Pro’ series sheath to make this more secure and versatile than ever.
On the side opposite the finger guard, there is a locking lever which makes it impossible for the knife to fall out of the sheath, no matter how much it gets shaken around.


A good look round the A1x – Things to look out for here are:

Onto this chunky piece of laminated steel with removable Thermorun handle scales. The lamination of the steel is easily visible in many of these photos.


The Blade and Handle – Detailed Measurements:

For full details of the tests and measurements carried out and an explanation of the results, see the page – Knife Technical Testing – How It’s Done.

The blade is made from Laminated CoS steel. This has the layers 420J2 – CoS – 420J2.


What is it like to use?

The A1x is one of the first blades to appear to contradict the SET testing in the previous section. The results for this CoS steel were not as good as I thought they would be, and this normally translates into real world edge retention. However with the A1x, the edge has been holding up fantastically in normal use, better than blades with superior SET results.
Considering my testing of the A1x involved plenty of heavy chopping as well as fine carving, and the edge just kept on going and going, there may be other unexplained factors at play.
I also found that when sharpening the A1x it proved very easy to get a really good edge. Some steels are more difficult to get a good edge on, but despite the high spec of the steel, it was very accommodating.
Of the three x series knives, the A1x is the biggest, and although the A1x blade is still only 160mm long, it has enough weight with the 7mm blade stock to be a very effective chopper.
7mm, YES, 7mm full exposed tang knife – that is 9/32″ for anyone preferring imperial.


7mm blade stock and a blade depth of only 31.5mm And a Convex Sabre grind, does mean the A1x is not a great slicer when deep cuts are needed. It is much more of a woodsman/bushcraft knife and well suited to wood processing, but less so for finer tasks. You can prepare food, and with the right technique use it for general cutting tasks, ensuring you use shallow cuts and allow the cut to open up to give the blade room to move through.

Fallkniven plastic sheaths can rattle a little, and the supplied sheath is right handed only due to the design of the knife retention. There are some left handed options available, so you might need to check this in advance.

A new development in the x series is the sheath lock, which works very well and negates the need for a fabric retaining strap. Once engaged the lock blocks the knife from moving so it can’t be released from the sheath. Security and peace of mind, a great new addition.

The A1x in its preferred habitat…

Everything about the Fallkniven A1x is simply reassuring – the blade thickness, the full exposed tang, the sheath lock, the steel, the convex grind, and not forgetting the pedigree. This is a knife I feel I really could trust my life to, and if I had to pick one blade to get me out of anything, this is right at the top of the list.

Review Summary

The views expressed in this summary table are from the point of view of the reviewer’s personal use. I am not a member of the armed forces and cannot comment on its use beyond a cutting tool or field/hunting knife.

Something that might be a ‘pro’ for one user can be a ‘con’ for another, so the comments are categorised based on my requirements. You should consider all points and if they could be beneficial to you.

I’m trying something slightly different and starting with what doesn’t work so well, so I can finish on a more positive note

_______________________________________________
What doesn’t work so well for me
_______________________________________________

Very thick blade makes it a poor slicer in thicker materials.
Sheath rattles a bit.
Right handed only sheath.
_______________________________________________
Things I like
_______________________________________________

Thick super-robust blade.
Very effective chopper.
Secure blade retention sheath lock.
Excellent edge retention.
Takes a great edge easily.
Full, exposed tang. Totally reliable.
Handle provides good comfortable grip.
Reassuringly solid.

Light Review: The 10,000 lumen Fenix LR35R

Can it be true? 10,000 lumens from a light you could fit in your pocket? In this review of the Fenix LR35R I put Fenix’s claimed output figures to the test. As well as this companion review there is a full length video review, with behind the scenes insights into the testing. It turns out that this light went beyond the limits of my test equipment and meant making modifications to allow an accurate reading to be taken.


Here is the video review:

INDEX:
00:00-01:20 Intro
01:20-07:31 Looking over the LR35R
07:31-13:28 Measuring parasitic drain
13:28-19:56 Troubleshooting – comparing cells
19:56-20:43 Troubleshooting – benchmark measurements for sensor modification
20:43-24:28 Modifying the integrating sphere
24:28-26:02 Results – USB charging
26:02-26:57 Results – Thermal imaging
26:57-30:40 Results – Runtime Graphs
30:40-32:11 Results – Beam shots
32:11-33:35 Summary


What is in the box?:
As this is a pre-production sample, there is no un-boxing as only the light was supplied.

A good look round the LR35R – Things to look out for here are:
Be sure to check the video for many of these details.


The beam

Please be careful not to judge tint based on images you see on a computer screen. Unless properly calibrated, the screen itself will change the perceived tint.

The indoor beamshot is intended to give an idea of the beam shape/quality rather than tint. All beamshots are taken using daylight white balance. The woodwork (stairs and skirting) are painted Farrow & Ball “Off-White”, and the walls are a light sandy colour called ‘String’ again by Farrow & Ball. I don’t actually have a ‘white wall’ in the house to use for this, and my wife won’t have one!


Batteries and output:

The LR35R runs on two 21700 cells which can be recharged in the light.

Please note, all quoted lumen figures are from a DIY integrating sphere, and according to ANSI standards. Although every effort is made to give as accurate a result as possible, they should be taken as an estimate only. The results can be used to compare outputs in this review and others I have published.

Before getting onto the output graphs, let’s quickly look at the USB charging graphs. Fenix have use a pulse charging approach which the three images show clearly. Peak charging current is 3A.


And the three runtime graphs which show the effect of the thermal regulation, and how this is countered with stronger cooling.


A thermal image taken during the runtime testing.

The LR35R in use

A real surprise that this output can be achieved in a light smaller than one of my old favourites, the TK35. It does heat up very quickly, and in normal use, hand held, the thermal regulation kicks in much faster than on the runtime graphs which had strong cooling.
The built in charging is very useful, especially as all the 21700 rated chargers I have would not take the long Fenix 21700 cells. It also means you don’t need anything else, and can swap the cells if needed.
As the LR35R is so small, I really wish Fenix had added a lower sub-lumen mode, as for me that would make it a fantastic all-rounder.
Be aware that the headline 10,000 lumens is only short lived, but if you take it down a notch or two, the performance is very very strong.
Beam tint and beam profile are very useable, and overall this is a powerhouse that is easy to live with.


Review Summary
The views expressed in this summary table are from the point of view of the reviewer’s personal use. I am not a member of the armed forces and cannot comment on its use beyond that covered in the review.

Something that might be a ‘pro’ for one user can be a ‘con’ for another, so the comments are categorised based on my requirements. You should consider all points and if they could be beneficial to you.

_______________________________________________
What doesn’t work so well for me
_______________________________________________

Lack of a sub-lumen mode.
Heats up very quickly.

_______________________________________________
Things I like
_______________________________________________

Hits that 10,000 lumen headline figure.
Very strong performance on High and Medium output.
Surprisingly compact.
USB-C charging built-in.
Comes with two high-capacity 21700 cells.
Great Beam tint and profile.

Light Review: Fenix HM65R Headlamp

With the HM65R, Fenix have fitted in so much, but have kept this headlamp small and light enough that you don’t have to think twice about taking it with you on any adventure (or even just taking out the rubbish).
The 18650 li-ion cell used to be the ‘enthusiast’s choice’, being unfamiliar to many users, even more so when strapped to your forehead – not any longer. The Fenix HM65R comes with a high capacity 3500mAh 18650 cell, and there is a built in USB-C charging port. The ONLY thing you need is a USB charger of some kind to open the door to this powerful and capable light.
Join me in this review of the Fenix HM65R to take a look at all the details and how it performs.

What is in the box?:
For maximum stability the HM65R has a top strap, and the full head strap comes assembled and neatly tucked away in the packaging.


A good look round the HM65R – Things to look out for here are:
I’m splitting this detailed set of photos into two galleries for a more manageable tour of the HM65R. The HM65R is almost ready to go out of the packaging, but first you need to remove a small insulator that keeps the battery from running down or the HM65R from being turned on accidentally. From the appearance of the threads of the battery tube, you can see that this is made of magnesium, a material chosen by Fenix to shave off a few more grams of weight.


Taking in more details:
First up in this gallery are the twin lenses – the larger spot emitter with clear lens, and the smaller flood emitter with honeycomb type diffuser lens.
For a more stable fit to your head, the inside of the front part of the headband strap has a grippy strip. Flipping the HM65R forwards gives access to the USB-C charging port and shows the angle adjustment mechanism.


The beam:

Please be careful not to judge tint based on images you see on a computer screen. Unless properly calibrated, the screen itself will change the perceived tint.

The indoor beamshot is intended to give an idea of the beam shape/quality rather than tint. All beamshots are taken using daylight white balance. The woodwork (stairs and skirting) are painted Farrow & Ball “Off-White”, and the walls are a light sandy colour called ‘String’ again by Farrow & Ball. I don’t actually have a ‘white wall’ in the house to use for this, and my wife won’t have one!

For both indoor and outdoor beamshots, the individual spot and flood beams are shown, then (as both can be turned on at the same time) the combined beam. Each of the photos in the set of three is at the same exposure and white balance.


Batteries and output:

The HM65R runs on a supplied 3500mAh 18650 Fenix li-ion cell.

Please note, all quoted lumen figures are from a DIY integrating sphere, and according to ANSI standards. Although every effort is made to give as accurate a result as possible, they should be taken as an estimate only. The results can be used to compare outputs in this review and others I have published.

Take note of the very good (low) parasitic drain measurement.

Also shown in this gallery is a charging graph for the built in USB-C charging. Although USB-C is capable of up to 3A, the HM65R seems to top-out at about 1.4A when charging.


The HM65R in use:

Straight off the bat, the HM65R makes itself a success with the stable and comfortable head strap (with top strap), and the choice of spot or flood beams (or both combined). Then, in using the high capacity 18650, you get a great runtime and powerful output (yet without too much weight), and the built in USB-C charging means you actually don’t need anything else – The HM65R is a complete kit.

There is one thing missing for me though, and that is a very low output. Even 9 lm, and even with this being on the flood beam, it is still too bright for dark adapted eyes. Frequently when I’m using headlamps, I will have dark adapted eyes (waking from sleep, or when I don’t want to disturb others); if only Fenix could squeeze in that lower mode, a sub 1 lm mode for both spot and flood output, it would make the HM65R a fantastic all-rounder.

If you want to go full blast, then your wish is the HM65R’s command – perfect visibility.


It is very helpful having the quick charge level gauge, with just a click letting you see if you will want to top up the battery.

Having used many Fenix headlamps over the years, and many competitors headlamps too, the HM65R definitely goes down as a choice for Pro users. I use the term ‘Pro’ to indicate this is a serious tool, capable of hard work, versatile and something worth investing in.

Review Summary
The views expressed in this summary table are from the point of view of the reviewer’s personal use. I am not a member of the armed forces and cannot comment on its use beyond that covered in the review.

Something that might be a ‘pro’ for one user can be a ‘con’ for another, so the comments are categorised based on my requirements. You should consider all points and if they could be beneficial to you.

_______________________________________________
What doesn’t work so well for me
_______________________________________________

Lacking a sub-lumen output level.
USB-C charging limited to 1.4A.

_______________________________________________
Things I like
_______________________________________________

Independently switch-able Spot and Flood beams.
Stable and comfortable head mount with top strap.
High capacity 18650 cell included.
Built in USB-C charging.
Very low (negligible) parasitic drain.
Nearly 1400 lm combined beam output.
Light weight.

Gear Review: NexTool Frigate 14-in-1 Folding Shovel

When I first picked up the NexTool (14-in-1) ‘Frigate’ shovel I was struck by how solid it felt, this was no ordinary folding shovel. Large and substantial, with plenty of heft and leverage to make this a properly effective tool. With a head that can be set to multiple angles to enhance its digging ability, changing from a shovel to a grubbing hoe, and a few extra functions thrown in to make it even more useful. Keep reading this review of the NexTool Frigate 14-in-1 Folding Shovel for all the details.

A few more details:

What’s in the box?:

Revealing the contents layer by layer.


A good look round the carry case – Things to look out for here are:

As well as the well provisioned case and carry strap, it is supplied with an Allen key and small spanner (to maintain the shovel’s folding mechanism) and some paracord. Inside are compartments for each section of the shovel.


A good look over the handle and included tools – Things to look out for here are:

One handle section incorporates a standard magnetic hex screwdriver bit holder and comes with a double ended bit. The end-cap of the handle incorporates a fluid compass, and removing that end-cap reveals a glass-breaker spike. Unscrewing the glass breaker part reveals a dual purpose whistle and firesteel. The two other handle sections are simple empty tubes.


A good look round the head of the shovel – Things to look out for here are:

The main event, the head of the shovel. There is a protective slip covering the shovel head when packed away. A ball-detent system locates the head at one of three angles/positions, 45 degrees, 90 degrees open (from closed) and fully open. Once the head is located by the detent, a locking collar then secures the head in the chosen position. The shovel head has an incorporated saw, two spanners, a bottle opener and a line cutter. The side opposite the saw could be sharpened for chopping, but is not sharp as supplied.


What it is like to use?

I’ve split this section’s photos into two galleries as the first relates to some general observations and the second to the results of the actual testing.
This first gallery is intended to give an impression of its portability and size. The fully packed tool weighs in at 1.68kg which is more than many folding shovels, so the important factor here is to decide how much work you are really going to do with it. Light weight shovels are great in most ways up until you have to use them, and may as well have a garden trowel. With that weight comes ability to do serious work. Look at the shovel leaning against a high-back garden chair, it is a size you can use standing up, you won’t need to be on your knees to dig.
The compartmentalised carry case ensures it easily all fits together and is surprisingly compact.


With the shovel begging to be used and do some serious work, I quickly came across a consideration and suggestion for anyone using this shovel – Take out all the ‘extras’ from inside the handle tubes and keep them separate.
The hex bit immediately comes out of the magnetic holder and then just bounces about. More annoyingly, the whistle and firesteel quickly shakes loose, falls into the tube and the firesteel will break. This is not a fault as such, but a practicality for when you start digging properly, so avoid the broken firesteel and annoying rattles, and just take these parts out before you start.
This is the most comfortable and effective folding shovel I have used. Its weight allows you to easily stab into the ground (as there is not a suitable surface to apply foot pressure) and then a long lever to make quick progress.


Personally I would not count on the additional functions but focus on the effectiveness of the shovel and its digging ability. The saw is useful for small notches, but not much more, and things like the spanners and bottle opener in the shovel blade might have use for prying and twisting jobs, but anything really needing these tools will want proper versions. Of course having is these functions is better than not having them.
Unlike some folding/telescopic shovels (that are less capable), the NexTool shovel becomes a little fussy when packing away. There is a separate shovel blade cover needed due to the saw, and the handle breaks down into a set of completely separate tubes. Depending on how far (or not) you travel each day, you might be leaving the full handle assembled and just fold the blade over for carry to your next camp site.
Having said this, the NexTool Frigate Shovel is actually a serious working tool, that can be packed down very neatly when you need to.

Review Summary

The views expressed in this summary table are from the point of view of the reviewer’s personal use. I am not a member of the armed forces and cannot comment on its use beyond that covered in the review.

Something that might be a ‘pro’ for one user can be a ‘con’ for another, so the comments are categorised based on my requirements. You should consider all points and if they could be beneficial to you.

I’m trying something slightly different and starting with what doesn’t work so well, so I can finish on a more positive note

_______________________________________________
What doesn’t work so well for me
_______________________________________________

Overall weight makes this a more considered carry.
Some extras (whistle/firesteel/screwdriver) need to be removed for digging.
Slightly fussy to pack.

_______________________________________________
Things I like
_______________________________________________

Seriously good at digging – far more so than most folding shovels.
Long handle makes digging while standing easy.
Very strong all metal build.
Takes-down into a very neat package.
Additional functions useful.

 

Discussing the Review:

The ideal place to discuss this review is on the Tactical Reviews Facebook Page
Please visit there and start/join the conversation.

Light Review: Nextorch T53 Hunting Kit

NEXTORCH have been working on LED swapping lights for some time, lights that maintain full beam quality; the Dual-Light models were the first of these that I used (like the P5G, P5R etc.). This Light Review is for the T53 hunting light set, that not only has a LED swapping triple colour output mechanism, but also a mount and remote switch.
The crucial difference with NEXTORCH’s lights and their LED swapping mechanism being there is no compromise of the reflector or beam. Typically, multiple LED light have the LEDs set into fixed, off-centre, positions in the reflector, compromising the beam. Instead the T53’s chosen LED sits at the reflector’s focal point, and is completely swapped for another LED positioned exactly at the reflector’s focal point… keep reading for all the details.

What is in the box?:

A first look at what the T53 set includes, which is all well presented in the box. Everything you need to use it is included.


A good look round the T53 Set – Things to look out for here are:

The images take you through the major components and the details of each of these. Starting with the clamp-mount to hold the T53 in various positions on the gun of your choice. It uses a cam-lever to lock into place. The mount also has a couple of small rail mount section so you can add extra accessories. A nice remote switch has both latching and momentary buttons on it, plus hook/loop straps for fitting to the gun.
There is a small socket in the tail of the T53 which takes either the charging cable or remote switch. With the appropriate plug in place, it can be rotated to lock it in the socket.


Taking a more detailed look at the LED switching:

This is the magic of the T53 (and other NEXTORCH LED swapping lights). The LED at the focal point of the reflector can be completely swapped for another by rotating the dial on the side of the light’s head.


The beam

Please be careful not to judge tint based on images you see on a computer screen. Unless properly calibrated, the screen itself will change the perceived tint.

The indoor beamshot is intended to give an idea of the beam shape/quality rather than tint. All beamshots are taken using daylight white balance. The woodwork (stairs and skirting) are painted Farrow & Ball “Off-White”, and the walls are a light sandy colour called ‘String’ again by Farrow & Ball. I don’t actually have a ‘white wall’ in the house to use for this, and my wife won’t have one!

In this gallery all exposure settings for the set of indoor or outdoor shots are the same.


Batteries and output:

The T53 runs on a supplied 2600mAh 18650 cell.

To measure actual output, I built an integrating sphere. See here for more detail. The sensor registers visible light only (so Infra-Red and Ultra-Violet will not be measured).

Please note, all quoted lumen figures are from a DIY integrating sphere, and according to ANSI standards. Although every effort is made to give as accurate a result as possible, they should be taken as an estimate only. The results can be used to compare outputs in this review and others I have published.

There is parasitic drain – this is included in the table of measurements.

Included in the gallery are the USB charging trace, a table of measured results, and the runtime trace for maximum white output (plus zoomed-in graph for the start).


The T53 Set in use

Let’s start with the T53 on its own. NEXTORCH lights always have a nice solid feel, and the T53 is built a little bigger to accommodate the LED swapping mechanism. Just as a single 18650 powered light, it is a little chunky and heavier than if it were only a single LED light. The tail-switch is not what I would term ‘tactical’ as it does not stand proud, making it a struggle to press far enough in to latch on if wearing gloves. This is not an issue at all in normal use, and certainly not a factor when moving to the remote switch.

Charging can be carried out internally using the supplied cable, and when doing so, in this example charged to a healthy 4.18V. Although not quite to 100% capacity, I much prefer this slight lower than 4.20V level as it is better for the life of the cell.

Before moving onto the gun mounting, a quick note on the tail-switch. This functions the same whether the remote switch is connected or not, in fact the two switches overlay their functions.
The tail-switch, if half-pressed, first turns on on high. If double-tapped you get strobe. However if you fully press to click it on, a subsequent half-press changes to low output.
The remote-switch, has a latching switch and a momentary switch. Either switch only gives access to high however many times you tap, you only get high.
Now, for example, if you had the tail-switch strobing, and then use the remote switch it changes to high, and once you turn the remote switch off it goes back to strobe. This is how they overlap each other.

In the next gallery the T53 is mounted onto a Chiappa Little Badger. More often than not, lights like the T53 are described as scope mounted. This is a personal bugbear as I dislike the way the spill light illuminates the gun and this creates a gap in the beam. So I will always, if possible, mount the light to the front of the gun to ensure none of the beam hits the gun. Here I’ve been able to fit the mount to the SAK sound moderator – it fitted, but was getting near the limit.

When fitting the mount, the design makes it very quick and simple to secure. The main adjustment is with the central screw and once snug, locking down the cam latch clamps it nice and tight.

Thanks to the hook/loop straps the remote switch fitted on easily, but larger stocks might prove too large for the straps.

The galley includes actual through-scope views.


For hunting use, I never looked back once I started using coloured lights, the difference is literally like night and day. There is also a massive difference between filters fitted to white lights, and pure colour LEDs, both in quality and brightness. I have no need to change colours on one outing as the gun is chosen for the quarry, and the colour to match the quarry. In theory I then don’t need the ability to change colour in one light. That said, it means the one light is suitable for all setups, and you won’t bring the wrong one.

Target illumination is very good with all colours, and something I found very useful was the ability to set the low output with the tail-switch and ramp it up to high as needed with the remote switch, then back to low again.

This is a very accomplished package from NEXTORCH.

Review Summary

The views expressed in this summary table are from the point of view of the reviewer’s personal use. I am not a member of the armed forces and cannot comment on its use beyond that covered in the review.

Something that might be a ‘pro’ for one user can be a ‘con’ for another, so the comments are categorised based on my requirements. You should consider all points and if they could be beneficial to you.

I’m trying something slightly different and starting with what doesn’t work so well, so I can finish on a more positive note

_______________________________________________
What doesn’t work so well for me
_______________________________________________

Tail-switch a little too recessed.
Remote switch straps may be too short for some guns.

_______________________________________________
Things I like
_______________________________________________

LED ‘swapping’ mechanism.
Three colour output, Red, Green and White.
Perfect beam for all colours.
Bright ‘through-scope’ view.
Built in USB charging (needing supplied cable).
Remote switch has momentary and latching switches.
Mount clamp is very secure.
Full kit provided, nothing else required (apart from a gun).

 

Discussing the Review:

The ideal place to discuss this review is on the Tactical Reviews Facebook Page
Please visit there and start/join the conversation.

Light Review: Surefire E2D Defender and Stiletto

With Surefire, your main expectations might be high quality build and performance, so read on to see if these lights keep up with Surefire’s standards. In this review are two quite different models; the latest update of the classic Defender E2D (in this case the two-mode ‘Ultra’) and the EDC-optimised pocket-friendly USB-chargeable multi-mode, programmable Stiletto.

What are we looking at?:

Though this review is all about the two headline lights, as well as primary cells I’ve been able to test the Surefire rechargeable cells for the Defender.


Moving onto the main feature let’s get into the details of these two.


Taking a more detailed look at the Stiletto:

The Stiletto is a new style of light, taking on more of the form of a pocket knife and slipping into your pocket in the same way, and with a clip to hold it in place. To achieve this narrow profile it has a built-in battery and USB charging, allowing the shape to not be compromised by replaceable batteries.


Taking a more detailed look at the Defender E2D Ultra:

The Defender E2D is a classic Surefire model, bit it has moved with the times. Starting life as a incandescent bulb light with lens/reflector, it has grown to use LED and TIR optics. This latest version has raised the output to 1000lm+. It is mainly the head of the light that has changed in appearance compared to the earlier models you might know.


Surefire’s rechargeable CR123 option:

Surefire have been a little behind other manufacturers with regard to taking up rechargeable batteries. In years past, dedicated Surefire owners have had to find their own way, often going to the lengths of getting their battery tubes bored out to take 18650 cells plus a few other methods.
In this case, the cells themselves are not Surefire branded, instead Surefire have chosen K2 Energy’s Lithium Phosphate cells.


The beam

Please be careful not to judge tint based on images you see on a computer screen. Unless properly calibrated, the screen itself will change the perceived tint.

The indoor beamshot is intended to give an idea of the beam shape/quality rather than tint. All beamshots are taken using daylight white balance. The woodwork (stairs and skirting) are painted Farrow & Ball “Off-White”, and the walls are a light sandy colour called ‘String’ again by Farrow & Ball. I don’t actually have a ‘white wall’ in the house to use for this, and my wife won’t have one!

The character of each beam is really very different. Starting with the Defender and it’s mix of smooth hot-spot and spill beam giving a very useful all-round capability. The spill beam is surprisingly wide, so much so you can see the bezel crenellation shaping in the outer edge of the beam.

The Stiletto has a Surefire ‘MaxVision beam’; I’ve come across a few variations of this, but in essence they have all been quite wide and evenly lit to give you ease of vision at close to mid ranges. You will notice in the direct comparison that the Defender’s beam is actually wider than the Stiletto’s. This is even more noticeable in the outdoor beam-shots. The Stiletto however lacks the hot-spot and provides nicely even lighting.


Batteries and output:

To measure actual output, I built an integrating sphere. See here for more detail. The sensor registers visible light only (so Infra-Red and Ultra-Violet will not be measured).

Please note, all quoted lumen figures are from a DIY integrating sphere, and according to ANSI standards. Although every effort is made to give as accurate a result as possible, they should be taken as an estimate only. The results can be used to compare outputs in this review and others I have published.

This is a table of measured results. PWM frequencies are recorded by an oscilloscope, and in some cases are clear and in others are more like superimposed noise. It only appeared that the Defender’s High beam when using the RCR123 cells showed any PWM. This is possibly due to power supply pulsing with the different voltage of the RCR123 cells which were able to produce a higher maximum output than on CR123.

In the runtime graphs, first check the start of the run and you can see how the RCR123 cells are capable of keeping that peak output from the Defender until the programmed slope-off of the output after 60s. However skip onto the full runtime and you can see the RCR123 cells run out after thirty minutes, but the CR123s go on a lot longer and with much more warning they are getting low. For ‘duty’ use you will still want to use CR123s, but the RCR123s give great guilt-free lumens.

Performance is solid from the Stiletto and output is more than good enough for EDC; 45 minutes of 500lm-plus output is impressive.


The Defender E2D Ultra and Stiletto in use

Though by no means a lesser light, there is perhaps slightly less to say about the Defender E2D, so I shall start with that. For me the ‘Ultra’ version is absolutely the one to have. The output levels are so opposite with a 9lm Low and a 1000lm+ High, these might seem too at odds to work well, but they do. If I could add one thing to the Defender E2D it would be a way to user program the Low to be the first mode, but without this the High-Low mode order ensures it lives up to its name.

Thanks to the beam shape and hot-spot, the 9lm mode does a great job for those daily needs of a bit of light. It hits the right balance of being low enough for complete darkness but not so low it is useless for anything but pitch black.

I have many 1000lm+ lights and many into the 5000lm+ level, yet the Defender seems to manage to appear brighter than similar output lights. I have never been left wanting by the Defender (running on the RCR123) with its solid performance and beam profile.

The slim body allows easy cigar gripping and general operation is what you expect from a tail-switch light.


And the Stiletto, this is a very different concept and is very different to use. It’s flat profile and large pocket clip make it one of the easiest lights I’ve used to pocket carry. Ergonomics are a really strong point with the Stiletto. In general use you will find the main side-switch falls nicely under your thumb. Side-switches are far superior to tail switches for EDC tasks, and make it more comfortable to hold the light for extended periods with a low arm position.

But of course, the Stiletto also has a tactical tail switch so you have the option of the high tactical grip with direct access to High. This leads me to the set of images in the gallery as I personally found the tail switch (which is quite stiff) gave me a few issues with grip and the Stiletto sliding forward. I had to use two methods to keep it stable; one was to hook my little finger just round the front of the aluminium head, and the other was to ensure I had the Stiletto rotated so I was gripping onto its width and not onto the flats. (check the gallery for examples) It has been fatiguing to use the tail-switch for longer periods, but with the streamlined shaping this is unavoidable.


The Stiletto’s main power switch is one of three areas on the rubber side panel; I am mentioning this to describe something else to be aware of. To the left of the main switch is a programming switch, this has not caused any issues in general use. However, the USB charging port cover is something to be aware of as I have often found myself trying to turn it on by pressing this part as it is quite ‘button-like’. It is very easy to do this, especially if wearing gloves, so just needs a little awareness and grip adjustment to correct.

‘Programming switch’ – yes the Stiletto can be programmed, with each switch independently programmed into one of two modes. I definitely prefer the default mode and I’d only change if I were mainly going to use the Stiletto in High. Programming is very easy – you hold the programming switch down until the indicator shows blue and then press either the main-switch or tail-switch to toggle it between modes. This programming switch also activates the emergency strobe.

Having three levels and the ability to swap the order from L-H or H-L is very useful. The most used mode for me was the Low, followed by Medium. High was too powerful for most of my EDC uses, but great to have for quick blasts.

The previous gallery has two in-use photos on a pathway to compare these two lights. In the earlier beam-shot gallery you could see the effect of the even circle of light the Stiletto emits. Once you get outdoors and don’t have light bouncing round to fill in the areas beyond the outer edge of the beam – the tunnel vision effect becomes more pronounced. You can see with both the Defender and Stiletto aimed in the same way, the Defender view is complete where the Stiletto’s beam leaves you blind beyond the narrower circle of the beam. Using the Stiletto in unlit areas required more beam movement and scanning to see where your feet are going.

Review Summary

The views expressed in this summary table are from the point of view of the reviewer’s personal use. I am not a member of the armed forces and cannot comment on its use beyond that covered in the review.

Something that might be a ‘pro’ for one user can be a ‘con’ for another, so the comments are categorised based on my requirements. You should consider all points and if they could be beneficial to you.

I’m trying something slightly different and starting with what doesn’t work so well, so I can finish on a more positive note

_______________________________________________
What doesn’t work so well for me
_______________________________________________

Defender E2D Ultra – no direct access to Low.
Stiletto – tail-switch a bit too stiff to hold-on in tactical mode.
Stiletto – beam profile can cause tunnel vision in unlit outdoor areas.

_______________________________________________
Things I like
_______________________________________________

Defender E2D Ultra – Powerful output (that seems more than it is).
Defender E2D Ultra – Great beam profile.
Defender E2D Ultra – Excellent neutral beam colour.
Defender E2D Ultra – High and Low level.
Defender E2D Ultra – Lockout.
Defender E2D Ultra – Slim and easy to carry.
Defender E2D Ultra – Super quality build.
Stiletto – Very ‘pocket friendly’ shape.
Stiletto – Choice of modes.
Stiletto – Two switches, side and tail.
Stiletto – Programmable modes for switches.
Stiletto – USB chargeable.
Stiletto – Fuel gauge indicator.
Backed by Surefire’s guarantee.

 

Discussing the Review:

The ideal place to discuss this review is on the Tactical Reviews Facebook Page
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As well as the Tactical Reviews Facebook Page, please consider visiting one of the following to start/join in any discussion.

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Knife Review: lionSTEEL bestMAN

I was first able to handle the lionSTEEL bestMAN folding knife at IWA 2019 – those were prototypes. The finished production knives shown in this review are further refined compared to the prototypes (which you might have seen on the @TacticalReviews Instagram). lionSTEEL have taken the traditional folding pocket knife and modernised it using the best materials and giving you the choice of two blade shapes, single or double bladed versions and five handle materials.

A few more details:

What’s in the box?:


A good look round the single blade bestMAN – Things to look out for here are:

Though looking very traditional, the bestMAN uses modern materials.


A good look round the double blade bestMAN – Things to look out for here are:

Packing in a second blade gives both available blade shapes in one knife. In this case a little more traditional with a wooden handle.


The Blade and Handle – Detailed Measurements:

For full details of the tests and measurements carried out and an explanation of the results, see the page – Knife Technical Testing – How It’s Done.

The blades are made from M390 steel.

Originally developed following the release of the Chris Reeve Knives Impinda, the bestMAN has been tested for opening and closing torque. The raw data is included but it is the average torque figures in bold that I would direct you to look at. Remember to check the technical testing link above for more on this.


What is it like to use?

After spending a lot of time carrying the single and double bladed versions, this feels the right place to start. Initially I would have been adamant that the double blade version was without doubt the one you had to have – two blades are better than one – one main blade and one left razor sharp as a backup – the whole ‘one is none’ thing. To a degree maybe, but I’ve gone the other way and found the single blade version to be my favourite. The reason being two-fold, firstly it is noticeably smaller and far less obtrusive in the pocket, and secondly it is much easier to open the blade. Nail-nicks are not ideal if your nails are softened by water or otherwise not very strong. With the single blade version you can pinch-grip the blade as well as using the nail-nick so opening is definitely easier.
The double blade version still has that advantage of giving both blade shapes and a second sharp edge, just with the burden of being a bit bigger.


If you do need to chose between the drop-point and wharncliffe, this might be easy if you have a firm favourite, and either way you won’t go wrong.
The straight cutting edge and lower point of the wharncliffe suits many EDC cutting tasks better for me than the drop-point.

Modifications:

No surprises for anyone reading my reviews, when I bring up the sharpening choil/rear point. Some of the bestMAN blades have a more pronounced cutting edge heel than others, but in general, not sufficient for my liking. I have made a minor modification to the blade heel to add a Victorinox style sharpening choil. Shown here is the double blade version with both blades modified.


Review Summary

The views expressed in this summary table are from the point of view of the reviewer’s personal use. I am not a member of the armed forces and cannot comment on its use beyond a cutting tool or field/hunting knife.

Something that might be a ‘pro’ for one user can be a ‘con’ for another, so the comments are categorised based on my requirements. You should consider all points and if they could be beneficial to you.

I’m trying something slightly different and starting with what doesn’t work so well, so I can finish on a more positive note

_______________________________________________
What doesn’t work so well for me
_______________________________________________

Double bladed version more difficult to open.

_______________________________________________
Things I like
_______________________________________________

Excellent M390 steel.
Nice traditional ‘friendly’ looking slip-joint.
Choice of two blade shapes.
Choice of single or double blade.
Choice of five handle materials.
Reliable design.
Smooth precise action.
Large nail-nick.

 

Discussing the Review:

The ideal place to discuss this review is on the Tactical Reviews Facebook Page
Please visit there and start/join the conversation.

As well as the Tactical Reviews Facebook Page, please consider visiting one of the following to start/join in any discussion.

BladeForums – Knife Reviews (US based Forum for Knife Discussion)

CandlePowerForums – Knife Reviews Section (Largest and Friendliest Flashlight Community Forum)

The BESS Exchange – A forum discussing technical aspects of sharpness and truly understanding your sharpening process.